A fuck you moment
#21
Ultimately, neither employees nor employers are irreplaceable. Sometimes I regret leaving my old job - where the CEO, someone I respect immensely, bro-hugged me and not only repeatedly insisted that I look him up if I ever want to come back, but told my girlfriend to make sure I do it - but then I remember why I left.

It's like a bad relationship: people stay in them for years thinking they'll crack the code and bring back whatever it was that that attracted them to the job originally, but that rarely happens. I asked for a raise that year hoping it would offset the incompetence of mid-level management, but while I was given part of it, it didn't make it any better and ultimately I was happy to leave for only a tiny pay increase and have autonomy over my work again.

Whatever the situation was between the OP and his employer, whoever was right and whoever was wrong, they were both better off splitting up.
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#22
You're mistaken and it's laughable that you would take the time to discredit me when you have no idea. I worked for a Trust company and bonuses were paid in March. I had the CFA designation. I did not work in NYC on Wall Street. I brought in more business than ever before due to the bull market and that meant a lot more work on my part. My boss was the CIO and his partner was the CEO. It's was a small imbred company. My Boss said I could earn more money by taking on new clients but he did not give me the opportunity to do that for the whole year leading up to this and when I brought this up he fired me.

Regardless, you didn't see my last thread. I got paralyzed by a rare disease not long after I made this thread. I don't really give a shit about this anymore.

https://www.swooptheworld.com/forum/show...hp?tid=776



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The original poster's writing is weak and the story seems distorted, at best. He mentions his boss, "upper management", and a CEO, but they are apparently all the same person in a ten-person firm. Wall Street firms pay bonus shortly after year-end. Bonus pools are a predictable percentage of profit, paid out based on seniority. So he knew what his bonus would be (he expressed no surprise), and had no strategic response. He just expressed entitlement to get paid more because the market went up. If you want to get paid when the market rises, then invest in the market. But that has nothing to do with the correctness of your pay.

You should not explain how hard you worked. You should explain what impact you have had, and how you are prepared to take more responsibility. You could also explain that your peers are earning higher bonuses for similar work. This insinuates that you could leave for more money in this booming economy, but are loyal.

The original poster is young, in his first finance job, and lacks a mature perspective on the industry. It is odd that his first title in finance would be "portfolio manager". Does he have a college degree or certifications in finance or portfolio management? What does he bring to the company, how easy is it to replace him, and what are his outside options? It doesn't sound like he performs a high-level function, or is particularly literate in finance and economics. Instead, he sounds like a belligerent punk who never even considered outside opportunities in the finance industry. That suggests that he has acquired no skills or connections, and was a captive employee performing menial clerical and sales duties. The boss sounds like a low-level brute, too.

Fortunately, I found video of their bonus negotiation.
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#23
(06-16-2019, 09:56 PM)Suits Wrote: Actually, I prefer hiring freelancers, remotely on a per-project basis. As long as I'm paying for the work they do and not by the hour, I could care less with how they otherwise conduct themselves on their own turf.

I prefer it this way, because I DON'T want my business need interfering with other people being true to themselves.

This is pure genius.  Why have someone mucking up your shit when they can work from their place and do whatever the fuck they want as long as they get the job done on time?
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#24
I am eventually going to quit the place I have worked at for 19 years. I used to have fantasies about doing something dramatic. All I am going to do is quit and travel Europe for awhile. Then come back to America and become a bus or truck driver.
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#25
(06-18-2019, 03:54 AM)Traveltothemax Wrote: I brought in more business than ever before due to the bull market and that meant a lot more work on my part. ... My Boss said I could earn more money by taking on new clients but he did not give me the opportunity to do that for the whole year leading up to this and when I brought this up he fired me.

I got paralyzed by a rare disease not long after I made this thread.
https://www.swooptheworld.com/forum/show...hp?tid=776

Yikes, sorry for your situation.  I thought it would be a storybook ending, where you luckily seized your last opportunity to travel before learning you had a disease.  Instead, it is a cautionary tale about health insurance and getting diseases in third-world countries.

Anyway, there are occasional rants where young guys impulsively tell their bosses to fuck off.  It is usually terrible career advice.
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#26
(06-18-2019, 03:54 AM)Traveltothemax Wrote: You're mistaken and it's laughable that you would take the time to discredit me when you have no idea. I worked for a Trust company and bonuses were paid in March. I had the CFA designation. I did not work in NYC on Wall Street. I brought in more business than ever before due to the bull market and that meant a lot more work on my part. My boss was the CIO and his partner was the CEO. It's was a small imbred company. My Boss said I could earn more money by taking on new clients but he did not give me the opportunity to do that for the whole year leading up to this and when I brought this up he fired me.

Regardless, you didn't see my last thread. I got paralyzed by a rare disease not long after I made this thread. I don't really give a shit about this anymore.

https://www.swooptheworld.com/forum/show...hp?tid=776



--------


The original poster's writing is weak and the story seems distorted, at best.  He mentions his boss, "upper management", and a CEO, but they are apparently all the same person in a ten-person firm.  Wall Street firms pay bonus shortly after year-end.  Bonus pools are a predictable percentage of profit, paid out based on seniority.  So he knew what his bonus would be (he expressed no surprise), and had no strategic response.  He just expressed entitlement to get paid more because the market went up.  If you want to get paid when the market rises, then invest in the market.  But that has nothing to do with the correctness of your pay.

You should not explain how hard you worked.  You should explain what impact you have had, and how you are prepared to take more responsibility.  You could also explain that your peers are earning higher bonuses for similar work.  This insinuates that you could leave for more money in this booming economy, but are loyal.

The original poster is young, in his first finance job, and lacks a mature perspective on the industry.  It is odd that his first title in finance would be "portfolio manager".  Does he have a college degree or certifications in finance or portfolio management?    What does he bring to the company, how easy is it to replace him, and what are his outside options?   It doesn't sound like he performs a high-level function, or is particularly literate in finance and economics.  Instead, he sounds like a belligerent punk who never even considered outside opportunities in the finance industry.  That suggests that he has acquired no skills or connections, and was a captive employee performing menial clerical and sales duties.  The boss sounds like a low-level brute, too.

Fortunately, I found video of their bonus negotiation.

That's horrible to hear man. Best wishes.
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