How do have good interactions in Latin countries if you aren't fluent in Spanish?
#21
Learn Spanish.

All ya'll want top notch pussy but don't wanna put in the work to be a top notch dude.

p.s. wearing a suit in medellin sounds like a good way to both sweat your balls off and get robbed on the same day.
Reply
#22
(12-29-2019, 11:12 PM)LatinoHeat Wrote: Learn Spanish.

All ya'll want top notch pussy but don't wanna put in the work to be a top notch dude.

p.s. wearing a suit in medellin sounds like a good way to both sweat your balls off and get robbed on the same day.

Again the post didn't say anything about not knowing any Spanish,it's about not being fluent and trying to meet women.
Reply
#23
One thing that can work is looking for girls that are some combination of upper middle class or higher, intelligent, have careers, etc. These girls tend to speak English fairly well and are open to men who don't come from latin machismo culture. It depends a lot on the area you are in and if those girls are attracted to you. This is going to work best for guys who dress decently, have lighter skin, stay away from the hostel crowd, etc. In many cases a short first date and waiting until the second date to take them back to your place is a better strategy than going for it on the first date.
Reply
#24
When I was in Colombia I was speaking basic Spanish. It was enough to get me by, but definitely limited my chances with a lot of girls. When I was out with girls I'd sometimes have to use Google Translate and I could see the frustration in their faces. Honestly I think most girls I banged were just into my looks (tall, white, colored eyes, athletic physique). There's no way they were impressed with my words, because I have limited vocabulary and my gringo accent makes me sound like a complete retard when I speak Spanish. I'm also a decent dancer which helps.

Becoming fluent in Spanish would open so many doors though. Maybe you can get by at night with aggressive game and good looks, but in a normal, day time environment, it's going to get boring very fast for you and the girl if you cannot communicate effectively. If I go back to Latin America I'll put in more effort to learn Spanish.
Reply
#25
Learn spanish otherwise you are significantly handicapping yourself. I cant even imagine having a google translate date. Might be cute for a few minutes but stupid tedious. I started learning spanish at 19. I studied it for about 2 years on and off and have since learned on the ground by just general learning.

Ill watch a show with spanish subtitles or read a spanish article. If I dont understand something I will ask what it means.

At this point the only issue I have a decade after I started is people telling me to talk slower which probably is in part because most of my time speaking spanish has been in Cuba.

If you cant speak the same language she either likes your looks or secondary factors like your money. If you are travelling to countries where you are assumed wealthy and you cant communicate you can probably assume much of the interest you receive is because of your perceived wealth.

Theres no reason with an hour or two a night you cant become good at spanish within 1-3 years.
Reply
#26
According to some studies you should be able to become fluent in Spanish with around 500 hours of study, I think the number might be kind of high but even so an hour or 1.5 hours of study a day on average for a year is not a big deal to achieve fluency.
Reply
#27
Years ago, I moved to Quebec. I spoke 0 French. My first weekend I hooked up with a Quebecois girl. As I lived there longer, I learned the French language and Quebecois culture. I never hooked up with a Quebecois girl again. The moral of the the story is that often being a completely naive outsider works to your advantage.
Reply
#28
Exactly, it's tough to compete with locals speaking perfect Spanish and dancing tango like Patrick Swayze ((no homo)). But you easily be an exotic foreigner, and your clumsy childish attempts at their language using the google voice app for example,  appeals to their mother instinct, the same instinct that causes them to rescue flea-bitten starving puppies. An added bonus is you can conveniently skip listening to their boring life stories and move straight to the bedroom haha.
(01-02-2020, 10:44 PM)Robert Plant Wrote: Years ago, I moved to Quebec. I spoke 0 French. My first weekend I hooked up with a Quebecois girl. As I lived there longer, I learned the French language and Quebecois culture. I never hooked up with a Quebecois girl again. The moral of the the story is that often being a completely naive outsider works to your advantage.
Reply
#29
It will take you more like 2000 hours to achieve fluency. 500 hours is nothing. Youll have ability to talk certainly but your ability to understand spoken spanish in group settings will be limited.

With that said someone with a romantic language background like italian may pick it up much quicker.
Reply
#30
2000 hours is way too much, students can become fluent in less than 6 months going to intensive Spanish school, obviously even less if they already speak French, Italian etc.

If you figure it took you 2000 hours of learning to achieve fluency then you were doing something wrong.
Reply
#31
We are talking about entirely different levels of fluency. I could work in a spanish country in 100% spanish in an advanced career aside from something like medicine. In 500 classroom or self study hours good luck understanding spanish at a high level when people are speaking in a group or in complex topics.

Of expats I can count on one hand how many ive met that can speak beyond that of a 5 year old. You probably wouldnt want to date a chick who speaks like your 5 year old niece.

Do you want to communicate in simple and direct terms or be able to cover just about any subject.

You can study 500 hours then learn passively through immersion 100%. Thats in line with what I did. But after multiple university classes and quite a lot of side studying when I arrived boots on the ground in a group setting keeping up was extremely difficult and exhausting. At night clubs where we typically went out in groups of 4-8 people I was useless after about 30 minutes of trying to keep up. The gains I made from my first two 4 month trips abroad were far more than those I made studying a significant amount of hours.

This is not relevant if you are simply learning for 1 on 1 dating. But in latin countries where people go out in groups its a handicap.

Where you may learn in 500 hours is if you move to a spanish country and study 500 hours while being immersed all day long. Thats entirely different then the guy who studys at home or in college in the west. In this case though you really are spending a lot more than 500 hours learning as you would spend over a 1000 hours additionally passively learning.

Immersion is the most important part to rapid advancement in my experience. Without immersion you can study as many hours as you want but you will have a hard time understanding.

If you were able to learn it in 500 or less hours power to you. You obviously have a better ability to pick up languages than I do.
Reply
#32
I'm not fluent in Spanish, I'm at a conversational level but I'm at less than 100 hours of former studying so with 5 times that amount I doubt I'd have many problems in day to day life. In a night club situation it's so loud and hard to understand everything even in your native language, maybe your idea of fluency is closer to native level.
Reply
#33
@SC87 you are at the beginning of your journey. Just keep at it and youll reach a level which you are content with. As you improve you open new doors.

Once you ger your boots on the ground youll make major strides.

One of the issues ive had is that because I spend long periods not speaking english is that I actually think in spanish quite often. I notice that my ability in english drops off until im back home for a week or two.

You are going to have success just by knowing the level of spanish you do because you are a step above the other foreigners.
Reply
#34
^The worst is being in a Spanish speaking country and hanging out with people who don’t speak it so you have to translate on the fly, it hurts my brain and I end up speaking English like a retard. It usually takes me a good week to stop saying gracias to service industry workers after returning home after a few months in Colombia, that always gets me weird looks.
Reply
#35
^I've noticed speaking a foreign language for extended periods messes up my English too.

I've never actually met a bilingual person who sounds equally polished in both languages.

I think its because youre activating and then deactivating certain parts of your brain and those pathways get rusty pretty quickly.
Reply
#36
(01-05-2020, 01:46 AM)Scotian Wrote: ^The worst is being in a Spanish speaking country and hanging out with people who don’t speak it so you have to translate on the fly, it hurts my brain and I end up speaking English like a retard. It usually takes me a good week to stop saying gracias to service industry workers after returning home after a few months in Colombia, that always gets me weird looks.

Even worse are the greetings and introductions.

Moving in for the customary cheek kiss and then suddenly pulling back doesn't give the best first impression.
Reply
#37
(01-05-2020, 07:01 AM)SpecialEd Wrote: ^I've noticed speaking a foreign language for extended periods messes up my English too.

I've never actually met a bilingual person who sounds equally polished in both languages.

I think its because youre activating and then deactivating certain parts of your brain and those pathways get rusty pretty quickly.

I’ve meet bilingual people from Montreal who seamlessly transition from French to English on the fly, it’s very impressive, I’m sure that such folk exist in Miami too but I agree that they likely speak one better than the other.
Reply
#38
(01-05-2020, 10:33 PM)Scotian Wrote:
(01-05-2020, 07:01 AM)SpecialEd Wrote: ^I've noticed speaking a foreign language for extended periods messes up my English too.

I've never actually met a bilingual person who sounds equally polished in both languages.

I think its because youre activating and then deactivating certain parts of your brain and those pathways get rusty pretty quickly.

I’ve meet bilingual people from Montreal who seamlessly transition from French to English on the fly, it’s very impressive, I’m sure that such folk exist in Miami too but I agree that they likely speak one better than the other.

I speak two languages fluently and would say I do sound equally polished in both languages and can transition between them whenever I want. I think in both languages even, sometimes mixing them in the same thought process. I know people who can do this in 3 or 4 languages. The common denominator is that they've learned their languages from a very young age. In many countries it's not uncommon to grow up speaking several languages. With age it gets a lot harder (though not impossible) to pick up new languages, let alone become fluent and transition to and from them.

I do notice that one of my languages sometimes gets a little bit rusty when I haven't spoken it for a while, but only for the first 10 minutes or so. I think it's key to keep up your exposure and keep having conversations in every language you speak. If you stop speaking a language altogether for a very long time (years) then yeah I'd say it's possible to lose some of it.
Reply
#39
Even if the accent is native in both, there's holes in the vocabulary at the upper registers. People usually just go to uni in 1 country..My experience with educated hispanics in the U.S was they were usually subpar in both languages.

Also if you havent lived in the country which the language is spoken for a while, you're not going to be familiar with a lot of slang. 1990s London accent that I had when I was a kid is very different from the one today for example.
Reply
#40
Plenty of white collar professionals are completely fluent in multiple languages, with perfect vocabulary.

Most of the EU staff in Brussels speak a more intellectual flavour of English as a second language than a large percentage of the UK population manage having it as a first language. Huge numbers of foreign workers in finance or tech in London likewise.

When you work in a challenging intellectual environment in your second language you get very good, very fast, or you don't progress.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)