Caracas 2019 Datasheet
#21
Rustler there is some truth to what you are saying but at the same time you can't live good in Colombia for $10-15 a day, if someone isn't as budget conscious and is less adventurous then say Medellin is an obvious choice.
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#22
(11-09-2019, 03:38 PM)markB Wrote:
(11-08-2019, 05:25 PM)BravoZulu Wrote:
(11-08-2019, 12:06 PM)markB Wrote:
(11-08-2019, 06:08 AM)BravoZulu Wrote: I assume that the OP is writing in good faith, but Venezuela is not as cheap as it has been in the past.  The best economic days for a foreign visitor with U.S. Dollars or Euros have been over for a few years, unless you want to risk buying property and you may lose when you sell.  
It is true that Venezuela is very affordable for a westerner, but the country has been undergoing an accelerated dollarization for the past 16 months and the cost of living, in general, is 2-3 times more expensive, in dollars, than it was 16 months ago and almost 50% more expensive than it was 6 months ago in April-May.  Some common items are 4-5 times more expensive.  In October 2019, many places, including taxis were accepting dollars.  It is a good bet to use dollars straight up with no middleman.  Ask the vendor.  Even teenagers are carrying dollars. The problem sometimes is getting exact change.
Maybe a certain forum member, who lives there part time, will come and drop some mana on the good stuff.

That's all true but the prices of accommodation, drinks, and transportation are still the cheapest in the region. Perhaps you would not be spending 15 dollars nowadays but even if it was 25, that's still pretty affordable imho.

Yes, it is the cheapest in the region, a great value with many hot women, and your value is extremely high as foreigner, but it is significantly more expensive than in the past.  You mentioned that contrary to what it used to be it is now very affordable.  This is just not the case, it has always been very affordable and although my experience is limited to a little less than 5 years, some have been there for 3 plus decades and could burn your ears for pages and pages.
 
It is good that you posted some information as there was Venezuela thread here a few years back, but it is gone now.  Gone like many of the beautiful women, better times and cheaper days.

If you read carefully, you would realize I was comparing today's affordability with that of Chavez's era, not 5 years ago. 1000 dollars will get you much more that in 2010.


I did read it carefully and I tried to be cool so that guys would not be mislead while attempting to indirectly support your thread.  Now, I will be very direct.  You are factually incorrect and this can be misleading.  In dollar terms, things were much cheaper in Venezuela from 1998-2013 under Chavez than they are now.  The opposite of what you stated.  The cost of living back then was a multiple cheaper than it is now or has been for the past year.  If you lived in country for $500 dollars per month from 2000 - 2010, now it will cost you $1000 - $1500 plus for the same life-style.  Currently the poverty rate is back up over 87% with 40% of nationwide business transactions being made in dollars by 57% of businesses.  Sixty three percent of Venezuelans in country have a relative outside the country sending an average of $105 each month which is up from $75 in 2018 (Ecoanalitica).

In the past, the cost of living was subsidized and when oil was over $100 and people were happy, especially the women because the state was supporting them and their children.  Today, add to that the minimal benefit from the exchange rate because of dollarization and it is easy to understand why it is more expensive.  Two large exceptions are gasoline and electricity, when you have them, as they are basically free and the cost of energy is a big part of your living expenses normally.

I do not know the sources for your reasoning, but I am in country a few times per year with some ex-military guys and we normally meet up with an older connected expat who has been there on and off since long before Chavez came to power. He is a wealth of information with a lot of detailed knowledge pre-Chavez, during Chavez and post Chavez. I met him years ago when we were doing diplomatic security for the NAM (MONAL in Spanish) Conference and my company contracted him to brief, train, and advise our teams for a few weeks.

When people go to visit, ask locals whether they be lower, middle, or upper class, how their cost of living has changed over the past 20 years and they will tell you and you will see that 2-3 times is on the conservative side.
Be professional, be polite, but always have a plan to kill everyone you meet.
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#23
(11-10-2019, 10:45 PM)BravoZulu Wrote:
(11-09-2019, 03:38 PM)markB Wrote:
(11-08-2019, 05:25 PM)BravoZulu Wrote:
(11-08-2019, 12:06 PM)markB Wrote:
(11-08-2019, 06:08 AM)BravoZulu Wrote: I assume that the OP is writing in good faith, but Venezuela is not as cheap as it has been in the past.  The best economic days for a foreign visitor with U.S. Dollars or Euros have been over for a few years, unless you want to risk buying property and you may lose when you sell.  
It is true that Venezuela is very affordable for a westerner, but the country has been undergoing an accelerated dollarization for the past 16 months and the cost of living, in general, is 2-3 times more expensive, in dollars, than it was 16 months ago and almost 50% more expensive than it was 6 months ago in April-May.  Some common items are 4-5 times more expensive.  In October 2019, many places, including taxis were accepting dollars.  It is a good bet to use dollars straight up with no middleman.  Ask the vendor.  Even teenagers are carrying dollars. The problem sometimes is getting exact change.
Maybe a certain forum member, who lives there part time, will come and drop some mana on the good stuff.

That's all true but the prices of accommodation, drinks, and transportation are still the cheapest in the region. Perhaps you would not be spending 15 dollars nowadays but even if it was 25, that's still pretty affordable imho.

Yes, it is the cheapest in the region, a great value with many hot women, and your value is extremely high as foreigner, but it is significantly more expensive than in the past.  You mentioned that contrary to what it used to be it is now very affordable.  This is just not the case, it has always been very affordable and although my experience is limited to a little less than 5 years, some have been there for 3 plus decades and could burn your ears for pages and pages.
 
It is good that you posted some information as there was Venezuela thread here a few years back, but it is gone now.  Gone like many of the beautiful women, better times and cheaper days.

If you read carefully, you would realize I was comparing today's affordability with that of Chavez's era, not 5 years ago. 1000 dollars will get you much more that in 2010.


I did read it carefully and I tried to be cool so that guys would not be mislead while attempting to indirectly support your thread.  Now, I will be very direct.  You are factually incorrect and this can be misleading.  In dollar terms, things were much cheaper in Venezuela from 1998-2013 under Chavez than they are now.  The opposite of what you stated.  The cost of living back then was a multiple cheaper than it is now or has been for the past year.  If you lived in country for $500 dollars per month from 2000 - 2010, now it will cost you $1000 - $1500 plus for the same life-style.  Currently the poverty rate is back up over 87% with 40% of nationwide business transactions being made in dollars by 57% of businesses.  Sixty three percent of Venezuelans in country have a relative outside the country sending an average of $105 each month which is up from $75 in 2018 (Ecoanalitica).

In the past, the cost of living was subsidized and when oil was over $100 and people were happy, especially the women because the state was supporting them and their children.  Today, add to that the minimal benefit from the exchange rate because of dollarization and it is easy to understand why it is more expensive.  Two large exceptions are gasoline and electricity, when you have them, as they are basically free and the cost of energy is a big part of your living expenses normally.

I do not know the sources for your reasoning, but I am in country a few times per year with some ex-military guys and we normally meet up with an older connected expat who has been there on and off since long before Chavez came to power.  He is a wealth of information with a lot of detailed knowledge pre-Chavez, during Chavez and post Chavez.  I met him years ago when we were doing diplomatic security for the NAM  (MONAL in Spanish) Conference and my company contracted him to brief, train, and advise our teams for a few weeks.

When people go to visit, ask locals whether they be lower, middle, or upper class, how their cost of living has changed over the past 20 years and they will tell you and you will see that 2-3 times is on the conservative side.

Let me just say that I lived there in 2010, you have not. I have first-hand information, you do not. I don't really care what your "friend" or "locals" have to say, I have been there and seen that. I'm ending the conversation at that and let other members chose whom to listen to, no point wasting my time with someone who doesn't know what he's talking about.
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#24
(11-11-2019, 03:28 AM)markB Wrote:
(11-10-2019, 10:45 PM)BravoZulu Wrote:
(11-09-2019, 03:38 PM)markB Wrote:
(11-08-2019, 05:25 PM)BravoZulu Wrote:
(11-08-2019, 12:06 PM)markB Wrote:

That's all true but the prices of accommodation, drinks, and transportation are still the cheapest in the region. Perhaps you would not be spending 15 dollars nowadays but even if it was 25, that's still pretty affordable imho.

Yes, it is the cheapest in the region, a great value with many hot women, and your value is extremely high as foreigner, but it is significantly more expensive than in the past.  You mentioned that contrary to what it used to be it is now very affordable.  This is just not the case, it has always been very affordable and although my experience is limited to a little less than 5 years, some have been there for 3 plus decades and could burn your ears for pages and pages.
 
It is good that you posted some information as there was Venezuela thread here a few years back, but it is gone now.  Gone like many of the beautiful women, better times and cheaper days.

If you read carefully, you would realize I was comparing today's affordability with that of Chavez's era, not 5 years ago. 1000 dollars will get you much more that in 2010.


I did read it carefully and I tried to be cool so that guys would not be mislead while attempting to indirectly support your thread.  Now, I will be very direct.  You are factually incorrect and this can be misleading.  In dollar terms, things were much cheaper in Venezuela from 1998-2013 under Chavez than they are now.  The opposite of what you stated.  The cost of living back then was a multiple cheaper than it is now or has been for the past year.  If you lived in country for $500 dollars per month from 2000 - 2010, now it will cost you $1000 - $1500 plus for the same life-style.  Currently the poverty rate is back up over 87% with 40% of nationwide business transactions being made in dollars by 57% of businesses.  Sixty three percent of Venezuelans in country have a relative outside the country sending an average of $105 each month which is up from $75 in 2018 (Ecoanalitica).

In the past, the cost of living was subsidized and when oil was over $100 and people were happy, especially the women because the state was supporting them and their children.  Today, add to that the minimal benefit from the exchange rate because of dollarization and it is easy to understand why it is more expensive.  Two large exceptions are gasoline and electricity, when you have them, as they are basically free and the cost of energy is a big part of your living expenses normally.

I do not know the sources for your reasoning, but I am in country a few times per year with some ex-military guys and we normally meet up with an older connected expat who has been there on and off since long before Chavez came to power.  He is a wealth of information with a lot of detailed knowledge pre-Chavez, during Chavez and post Chavez.  I met him years ago when we were doing diplomatic security for the NAM  (MONAL in Spanish) Conference and my company contracted him to brief, train, and advise our teams for a few weeks.

When people go to visit, ask locals whether they be lower, middle, or upper class, how their cost of living has changed over the past 20 years and they will tell you and you will see that 2-3 times is on the conservative side.

Let me just say that I lived there in 2010, you have not. I have first-hand information, you do not. I don't really care what your "friend" or "locals" have to say, I have been there and seen that. I'm ending the conversation at that and let other members chose whom to listen to, no point wasting my time with someone who doesn't know what he's talking about.

MarkB, I say this in good faith, how about you post your specifics as to how things are cheaper in dollars or Euros or grams of gold now than in 2010 or send it to me via PM and we will keep it private?  I will do the same in response either in a public post or privately via PM.  

If you agree. what is the time frame for your data, 1 month, 6 months, 12 months?  My data will be annually based on the entire 12 months for any given year and not seasonally adjusted across the years.  If you have good data that you can hopefully backup, I will listen and concede publically, even if it is only in a few small instances.   I have already conceded with gasoline and electricity.  Gasoline will cost you .008 cents to fill up a 60L tank of gas now where in 2010 it was under 25 cents for a tank or that your electricity bill from Seneca in 20010 (now Corpolec since 2016) from a house over 400 SQM was about $3 dollars per month in 2010 and now only a few cents even though they no longer send out the bills.  Yes I have copies of Seneca Bills to prove your point that it was cheaper in some instances back in 2010. I will further concede that property taxes are less now than in 2010, but hat this may change shortly due to a reworking of the UT system.

This is reasonable, however, if you choose not to, ok, I have done nothing to earn it from you, but if a member asks you a straight up question based on quantifiable and verifiable data and you do not answer, do not  be surprised  if you are called into question in the future.

Yes. people should decide for themselves especially with first-hand information and experience.  Go there now, keep track of what a Big Mac, a movie ticket, a taxi, a bag of groceries, your hotel, a housing rental, a light bulb, cleaning liquid, car maintenance, etc., costs and put it in a spreadsheet for the future, then try to get data as far back in the past that you can and compare.  I recommend you do this for every place you visit so you can make better decisions in the future.

 
Bravo Zulu
Be professional, be polite, but always have a plan to kill everyone you meet.
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#25
Cheeseburger price aside, I would like to be the voice of reason for people considering this and strongly urge them to avoid Venezuela.
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#26
No need for arguing on price differences I believe. OP delivered and gave some solid info on Venezuela, BravoZulu posted some of his info which contradicts some of the info, but in general I'm sure we can agree that Venezuela is the cheapest place in the region and by changing USD on the black market you can live like a king for little money. Let's focus on expanding the info we have and see if others have more experiences in Venezuela.

It would be great to see this forum become a go-to spot for info on some of the least known places in the world.
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#27
More data on black market exchanges would be great.

I'm almost happy to see this argument breaking out because it reminds me of the no-bullshit approach RVF used to have. I don't really care who's right in this case lol
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#28
This guy went over some prices in the video, at one point they were near a hot dog stand and I forget exactly how much it was but it was a couple bucks for a hot dog with the black market conversion. That seems pretty expensive considering you can get a shitty hot dog in Colombia for less than a $1 USD.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jN5LZR4ejkg
edit - the embedding doesn't work
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#29
(11-12-2019, 09:35 AM)Shifty Wrote: Cheeseburger price aside, I would like to be the voice of reason for people considering this and strongly urge them to avoid Venezuela.

It's a risk regardless of skin color, but If I wasn't white I'd consider going. Being half Latin American and knowing Spanish, they'd still take one look at me without knowing I'm not wealthy and kidnap me for ransom.
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#30
Take a look at Pedidostogo, there you can get an idea of food (delivery) prices
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#31
^ I looked through some of the stuff on there, it's pretty expensive.
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#32
I want more detailed info on how to slay here.  Obviously abnormal conditions demand abnormal technique..

I turned down a great job in Caracas in 2018.. still sort of kicking myself.. just couldnt' see myself rolling in dough while my colleagues starved
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#33
I doubt you would need any special technique to "slay", you are basically walking around with a sign that says millionaire to most Venezuelans.
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#34
Well if you want to bang easy (desperate) Venezuelans in comfort you do that in Medellin.
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#35
(11-18-2019, 06:48 PM)SC87 Wrote: Well if you want to bang easy (desperate) Venezuelans in comfort you do that in Medellin.

I think Cúcuta would be more more convenient for that particular purpose.

(11-18-2019, 05:42 PM)Shifty Wrote: I doubt you would need any special technique to "slay", you are basically walking around with a sign that says millionaire to most Venezuelans.

Believe me it's not that easy. There are many Venezuelans that are well of, there still is competition.
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#36
The real issues that men should focus upon are access, competitive advantage, and risk assessment. These are essential concepts for a bachelor traveling the world. Make a rational decision based on your experience and items such as Greater freedom to do things, greater freedom from restrictions on doing things, access to a relatively higher standard of living, access to different ways of living, and access to better looking and (insert quality) women, while remembering that pussy is pussy and that there are no unicorns because people are more poor or living in some distant land.

In general if you want to know about price differences today in Venezuela, go into one of the thousands of long standing bodegas country wide and ask them about a case of Polar or a bottle of whiskey, or go into one of a thousand stores that have been around for a few decades and ask about their costs and their prices over time.

Specifically a few differences include,

Monthly membership to same gym. 2010 $1.50 Nov. 2019 $20
Basic weekly groceries at the same store for 2 people. 2010 $28. Nov 2019 $96.
These same gardener working the same house. 2010 $1.75. Nov. 2019 $12.
The same car, the same auto dealership. Diagnose a problem. 2010 $10. Nov. 2019 $40.
Replace hot tub cover, same hot tub, same vendor. 2010 $18. Nov. 2019 $102.
A UPS battery backup for a computer, same brand, same store, 2010 $10. Nov. 2019 $60.

All of these examples, even the gardener, were dealing in U.S. dollars directly in Nov. 2019 or you could convert based the black market that day. The advantage of the black market is largely gone now with dollarization.

Although it continues to be relatively cheap, the problem is that some men may think that they can live on $100 a month (or like a king for $1000) because they read an internet article and also read on some forum that it is less expensive now than in 2010 and they are going to be eating shit sandwiches.

If you want the details, talk to the teams at

Ecoanalitica lead by Asdrubal Oliveros info@ecoanalitica.net (58) 212.266.90.80.
Dataanalisis (58) 212.707.48.11 / Whatsapp: (58) 424.250.76.33, eventos@datanalisis.com led by Luis Vicente Leon.
Econometrica lead by Angel Garcia (Banchs) at (58) 212.814.06.30 / 212.991.25.54, ventas@econometrica.com.ve

Having said these things, you are only partially correct Bravo Zulu, because at the higher end of the income strata it is not the same. Ten K or 25 K per month in the west is no big deal, but in Venezuela it is and the cost of living in dollars at this strata has increased 40-50% over the past 10 years, with the exception of bribes as they are 3-10 times higher. Also Seneca was expropriated in 2012 and renamed Corpoelec.
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#37
Most people earn 4 dollars a month compared to 250 in 2010. You're paying your gardener too much.
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#38
(12-15-2019, 04:38 PM)markB Wrote: Most people earn 4 dollars a month compared to 250 in 2010. You're paying your gardener too much.

It is the same guy who has been working high end houses for decades.  The market is different now because dollarization has changed the economics and 14% of the population has emigrated since 2015.   What was the average IQ of 82-83 in the past and the basic skill level for most jobs and services has declined with about 20% of the population leaving over the past two decades.  It is the worst of both worlds now whereas in the previous decades it was the best of both worlds.

This is why poverty and extreme poverty is on the rise, the remaining poor have few skills and tools in a unofficially dollarized market.  If you want people with better skills or that have tools...the price went up. More will leave and more will get crushed as an equilibrium is reached over the coming years or decades.  It happened with less severity in Brazil in 1986 and again the following decade, Ukraine in 1992-3, Nicaragua in 1993-94 Ecuador in 1999, where they officially dollarized as a result, as well as multiple times in Argentina.
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#39
A bottle of Polar at a patio in Las Mercedes is ONE ($1) dollar. Things are getting better, you can actually go out and do normal shit....but still see kids that are probably malnourished playing around street intersections. People go out and dine in the evenings outside. Caracas is somewhat normal, rest of the country is a shithole that keeps getting worse.

If you think you're going to be drowning in pussy you might want to rethink again, these hoes won't like you just because you're white. If a girl starts calling you amor, bebe, mi vida, or something cute....she's going to hit you up for money. The sooner and more frequent she does this, the sooner the topic will be raised. She will mention something like nothing having to eat, having to forgo income bc she left her job early to see you, or since Christmas is around the corner....she needs a new dress because "in my culture we dress with new clothes for Xmas and New Years". Even girls who are middle class will ask you but more subtly. They want a new dress, heels, or hang with their friends at country club and buy a drink but have no money. I might post pictures or video if I can get that shit to work from my phone. If they start getting chatty online I just say "No tengo paypal" without giving a fuck about their response".

As it is culturally, the girls want to move to Miami even though it's expensive and floods because that's how their dense head works. They prefer Canada and Europe over the US, better social benefits and it rewards a culture that doesn't want to work. Don't expect conversations that go above surface level, the girls are just as dense as their Colombian counterparts and don't have the personality of Mexican girls. Send them a message with your whats's app, they reply only with their number....chat with them, and they will reply with their number. Still some bangers but all the primer goods are now in Colombia, Madrid, and Florida. Instagram works wonders with Venezuelan women.

Some pictures from CCS:


Will he get the bang?
[Image: tXvg3yc.jpg]

Beaucup bucks niggas
[Image: C2ywSDE.jpg]


[Image: U49zz4x.jpg]
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#40
(11-18-2019, 02:37 AM)k pop Wrote: I want more detailed info on how to slay here.  Obviously abnormal conditions demand abnormal technique..

I turned down a great job in Caracas in 2018.. still sort of kicking myself.. just couldnt' see myself rolling in dough while my colleagues starved

Two words.  Fitness Models.  Learn about them, their social circle (including their trainers), the competitions and circuits, and their involvement with health products.  After you have been with one of the better ones and been seen with them on one of their circuits, because you took them to their regional or national competition or expo, it leads to a second and a third and a new social circle.

The high end beauty queens are significantly more work and they are not as fun or adventurous.

You missed the front row seat and adventure that August. The crew was only 3, you would have been the fourth.
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