Passport Visa Tips & Tricks
#1
Figure it'll be a worthwhile topic.

Let's dive into the one I've been using - for nearly two years - to travel in Poland and the Schengen Area.

From the Polish Embassy in DC: http://www.waszyngton.msz.gov.pl/en/wasz..._en_visas/
Quote:IMPORTANT FOR THE US CITIZENS: Based on an exchange of diplomatic notes between Poland and the USA, since April 15th, 1991 the US citizens are allowed to enter Poland for any 90 days period without visa. The common rule 90 days of stay in 180-day period does not apply in this case. Please note that the common rule is applicable for other Schengen States, and if its a consecutive trip to Poland you must cross the Polish border directly from the third country (non-Schengen State) e.g. direct flights from Chicago, New York, London, Moscow, Kiev etc.

I should note from a recent experience, though, that the UK, for whatever reason, does not like being used as a border run destination. In fact, according to someone I know who also uses the above, the UK does not even like folks staying there for 90 days to get around the common rule mentioned above. I'll be taking my border run money again to grateful places like Ukraine instead.

Also, as I understand, Hungary has a similar rule, though I've never used it: http://konzuliszolgalat.kormany.hu/visa-...agreements

Finally, Denmark and Latvia each seem to have 90/180 clocks they consider separate from Schengen:
Latvia: http://www.mfa.gov.lv/en/consular-inform...-agremeent
Denmark: https://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-us/coming_t...travel.htm
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#2
It's a nice idea, the only one I knew about was Poland. Wish I could add more to this.
In Philippines if you want to avoid paying the extension fee you have to leave the country every month, but I don't think it's as practical as getting an extension for 60$.
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#3
(04-09-2017, 09:50 AM)20Nation Wrote: It's a nice idea, the only one I knew about was Poland. Wish I could add more to this.
In Philippines if you want to avoid paying the extension fee you have to leave the country every month, but I don't think it's as practical as getting an extension for 60$.

You can get a 59 day visa when you first go through immigration at the airport. I did this in january, and it cost me about 3000 pesos. Saves the hassle of getting an extension once you're already in the country.
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#4
Just used the Poland loophole I mentioned above, flying non-stop from Gdansk to Kiev and back.

No visa issues.
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#5
I have a secondary source (ie not myself but a buddy) confirming the above Poland loophole works.

Also applying for a passport card tomorrow ( https://travel.state.gov/content/passpor.../card.html ), while renewing my passport book, so I can carry the passport card around as proof of my citizenship, while keeping my passport book safe at my apartment (save for international air travel, where the book is still required).

Edit: I also have a secondary source (another buddy) confirming the above Denmark loophole works (see bottom of linked page for details).
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#6
Carry your passport at all times in your pocket. Once the cover is well worn, you can use it to impress girls with how well travelled you are.

The last time I flew out of Canada, one of the 50 year old members of the gate crew was visibly impressed and commented on how I was clearly a well travelled man with a well worn passport.
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#7
(04-09-2017, 09:50 AM)20Nation Wrote: It's a nice idea, the only one I knew about was Poland. Wish I could add more to this.
In Philippines if you want to avoid paying the extension fee you have to leave the country every month, but I don't think it's as practical as getting an extension for 60$.

I got my first extension last week. 2130 pesos exact. 36 euro or 42 usd at current exchange rates.
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#8
Just got back from the US Embassy in Warsaw. Aside from what's on their website, here are some other tips:

1) You can pay 30 PLN to have them send the new passport to your address in Poland via DHL, after the US government prints your new passport in 1-2 weeks, but you have to surrender your current passport at the same time you submit your forms.

2) Since I had no other means of identifying myself as a US citizen in case something happened, I took the other choice they gave me, which was to keep my current passport, but to come back to the embassy when they receive my new one, at which point I'll only then have to surrender my current passport. They'll notify me via the e-mail address I listed on the forms.

3) The whole process this Monday morning took less than two hours. No guarantees that'll be your experience, but FYI.

4) When you show up for your appointment, they don't actually seem to be expecting you. I had to ask the cashier if I was in the right place before anything got going.
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#9
Just picked up my passport from the embassy. They invalidated my previous one by punching holes in the bottom of the main page and cover, though like the last one I had, I got to keep this one too.

Passport cards apparently take weeks to prepare, so I told them to send it to me by DHL to my Polish address.
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#10
Just heard from a second-hand source that going from Ukraine to Poland by overnight bus at Hrebenne (between Lviv and Lublin) took 11 hours at the border alone.

Flying or walking across at Przemsyl may be better.
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#11
avoid going to immigration offices on fridays and mondays if possible
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#12
How many guys have more than one passport?
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#13
That was something I was planning on having before I really settle for good in China but it was a little bit complicated for the few times I would have had the chance to use it.

Personally, I would be more interested in getting a second nationality that complete my French passport.
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#14
Not sure what you mean TigerT, or did I not word my question good? I was thinking in terms of 2nd pass port with another country.

I have a USA pass port and have been looking at other countries where I could get a 2nd passport.

Rereading I think where on the same train. hmm
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#15
ive heard about this before but can anyone explain the advantages to me?
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#16
@Barbarian Father:
I thought you were talking about asking a second passport from the USA (have two American passports).

It is used for two differents reasons:
-You travel often and your passport is blocked by an embassy for visa procedure: you are in Thailand and you apply there for the visa for going to Myanmar (long procedure if I remember when I did 7 years ago, now it is a lot easier but you get my point). Your home country can deliver you a second passport to allow you to go Malaysia for example for a visa trip
-Incompatible destination: you have been to Israel (you have the stamp on it) and wish to go to a Muslim country after. Since some of them (Iran for example) are known to refuse people who have an Israeli stamp on their passport, one for Israel, one for the Muslim countries can solve the problem. I think it is the same with the two Koreas.

For getting a dual citizenship:
Depends on what is advantageous for you. An American passport is good but many countries (China, Laos off the top of my head at least) make you pay a lot more than others. The advantage of dual nationalities is to be able to move more freely but I don't think an American nationality banned you from entering any country. A page I like to look at is the "Visa requirements for ... citizens " on Wikipedia. For example for me:

[Image: Visa_requirements_for_French_citizens.png]

The grey countries are the ones I need to apply for a visa in advance. Having full residency in China takes care of the Chinese problem for me and I am not really interested in the others except Russia maybe.
Having a fitting dual citizenship might make the problem of getting a visa for Russia disappear. Let's say I get Serbian citizenship:

[Image: Visa_requirements_for_Serbian_citizens.png]

I can go to Russia visa free with my Serbian passport and to the US visa free with my French passport
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#17
Dual nationality is what I have been looking at and was wondering if any one has done.

Having two passports for the US had not crossed my mine, the idea of me visiting one country and not being accepted in another because of that stamp was on the fringe of my thoughts but never solidified. Thank You for the food for thought.
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#18
Start with your lineage.
If you can prove you got parents from somewhere else (or up to great grandparents) then you can start with that.
A lot of Italian, Spanish, dutch, Greek etc

If you're Jewish, Israel passport on the basis of the "law of return"

If none of the above, wife or good old staying in a country being a resident will give you a citizen after x amount of years.
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#19
For guys using any of the Schengen loopholes below, I should note that when I flew from Wroclaw to Malaga, the Spanish had everyone on my flight go through immigration.

It was probably just a security check - not a visa one. I've experienced similar checks crossing some other borders within Schengen, such as when I flew into the EuroAirport (Basel) from Venice.

The Spanish immigration officer did stamp the new US passport I got in Poland though, likely because it had no other stamps in it.

(04-04-2017, 06:53 PM)262 Wrote: Figure it'll be a worthwhile topic.

Let's dive into the one I've been using - for nearly two years - to travel in Poland and the Schengen Area.

From the Polish Embassy in DC: http://www.waszyngton.msz.gov.pl/en/wasz..._en_visas/
Quote:IMPORTANT FOR THE US CITIZENS: Based on an exchange of diplomatic notes between Poland and the USA, since April 15th, 1991 the US citizens are allowed to enter Poland for any 90 days period without visa. The common rule 90 days of stay in 180-day period does not apply in this case. Please note that the common rule is applicable for other Schengen States, and if its a consecutive trip to Poland you must cross the Polish border directly from the third country (non-Schengen State) e.g. direct flights from Chicago, New York, London, Moscow, Kiev etc.

I should note from a recent experience, though, that the UK, for whatever reason, does not like being used as a border run destination. In fact, according to someone I know who also uses the above, the UK does not even like folks staying there for 90 days to get around the common rule mentioned above. I'll be taking my border run money again to grateful places like Ukraine instead.

Also, as I understand, Hungary has a similar rule, though I've never used it: http://konzuliszolgalat.kormany.hu/visa-...agreements

Finally, Denmark and Latvia each seem to have 90/180 clocks they consider separate from Schengen:
Latvia: http://www.mfa.gov.lv/en/consular-inform...-agremeent
Denmark: https://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-us/coming_t...travel.htm
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#20
Just came back to Poland through Denmark after visiting the US for Thanksgiving (also went from Poland through Denmark to get to the US).

I did get a new passport in Poland before I left, but my guess is the Denmark loophole (now at https://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-GB/You-want...ree-visits ) worked.

Website is new, but text seems the same:
Quote:Citizens of certain countries are entitled to stay in Denmark for 90 days, regardless of stays in other Schengen countries

Citizens of Australia, Canada, Chile, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea and the US can freely enter and stay in Denmark for up to 90 days in any 180-day period, regardless of whether they have stayed in another Schengen country prior to entry into Denmark. The 90 days are counted from the entry date into Denmark or another Nordic country. If you have previously spent time in Denmark or another Nordic country within the previous 180 days, that time will be deducted from the 90-day maximum.
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